Mike Procter – Cricket Legend

Mike Procter

“A fast bowler and hard hitting batsman, he proved himself a colossal competitor in English first class cricket” – Mark Nicholas

In the 70s, Mike played county cricket for 13 years as an overseas player for Gloucestershire and led them to great success. Fans even jokingly renamed the team Proctershire.

Mike Procter sharing the commentary box with Bill Lawry for THAT 1999 World Cup semi-final

The Mike Procter foundation uses cricket as a vehicle to help children in South Africa  improve their self-esteem and escape the harsh realities of their everyday life.

In 1971 Mike Procter staged a walk-off at Newlands, in protest of the apartheid government refusing to endorse a multi-racial touring party.

The Procter CV:

 South Africa, Natal, Western Province, Rhodesia and Glouestershire; Rest of the World, World Series Cricket and Captain of the South African XI in the first years of rebel tours; coach or director of cricket at international, provincial and country levels: international match referee; commentator for four networks worldwide; chairman of the national selection panel; Founder of the Mike Procter Foundation and he never lost a match at Lord’s!

Early Cricket Career (South Africa)

Mike Procter – Michael John Procter (born 15 September 1946) is a former South African cricketer. He was denied the international stage by South Africa’s banishment from world cricket in the 1970s and 1980s. He was a Wisden Cricketer of the Year in 1970 and South African cricketer of the year in 1967.
Educated at Hilton College, he played for Natal in the Nuffield week and for South African schools in 1963 and 1964. His brother, AW Procter, cousin AC Procter and father WC Procter all played first-class cricket.

Procter is the only man to make over 500 runs and take 50 wickets twice in a domestic South African season, in 1971–72 and 1972–73, when he took a then record 59 wickets in eight Currie Cup games. In 1970 he entered the record books, to join the exalted company of Sir Donald Bradman and C.B. Fry, in scoring six successive first-class centuries for Rhodesia.

Cricket career in Gloucester (Proctershire)

He played county cricket for 13 years as an overseas player for Gloucestershire and led them to great success. Fans even jokingly renamed the team Proctershire. His whirlwind, chest-on pace bowling lifted Gloucestershire from the unfashionable depths of the county championship to second in 1969 as he blasted his way to over a hundred wickets. Four centuries followed in 1971, the last lifting them from 28 for three to a target of 201 in just over two hours against Yorkshire. Procter scored 109 not out in Gloucestershire’s 135/3 in the 1974 John Player League – the lowest team total in List A cricket to include a century.[3] He destroyed Worcestershire single-handedly in 1977, scoring a century before lunch and taking 13 wickets for just 73 runs. He picked up another century before lunch in 1979, against Leicestershire, winning the Walter Lawrence Trophy for the season’s fastest century, and then ripped through their batsmen with a hat-trick for good measure. Procter defied insurmountable odds in the very next game, against Yorkshire, by taking another hat-trick, all trapped leg-before. The potency of his muscular inswinging fast bowling can be seen by the fact that his feat of taking two hat-tricks of LBWs is unique in the first class game. He captained them with distinction from 1977 to 1981 and was hugely popular with teammates and supporters alike. He was the Professional Cricketers’ Association Player of the Year in 1970 and 1977 and won the Cricket Society Wetherall Award for the Leading All-Rounder in English First-Class Cricket in 1978.
As captain he led Gloucestershire to the Benson & Hedges Cup in 1977, as director of coaching he guided Northamptonshire CCC to their triumph in the 1989–90 NatWest Trophy final and in 1994 he was coach as Kepler Wessels’ South African team stunned England at Lord’s by 356 runs. As a player Procter had beaten England there in 1970 with the Rest of the World XI and won the Gillette Cup for Gloucestershire in 1973, scoring 94 and taking two wickets against Sussex.

Mike Procter Foundation

Mike is the Founder of The Mike Procter Foundation. A project to enhance the lives of South Africa’s most vulnerable citizens, with 90 percent of children  attending the Ottawa Primary School estimated to be aid victims and facing a daily struggle against hunger and crime. The Mike Procter foundation uses  cricket as a vehicle to improve self-esteem, escape the harsh realities of everyday life and provide an environment for children to be children.

Quotes

Quotes

On SA being allowed to play in their first World Cup 1992: (Mike was the Coach during South Africa’s debut in 1992 Cricket World Cup)

“At first we thought we weren’t going to play in the World Cup at all, because even though we were back in the fold, the time frame was too
tight. It would be too much of a rush to reorganise to include us,” recalled Mike Procter, South Africa’s coach at the time. “But then out
of the blue, we were told we were going. It was like Father Christmas arrived ten times on the same day.”

“Pressure is not when you are losing and you have to win, it’s when you’re expected to do something and you need to do it”

“The past divided South Africa and people were treated unequally and we knew that but we wanted to show that it could be different.”

“But we left knowing that we put South Africa on the map, we told them South Africa is back and not looking back.”

 

 

Videos

Videos:
Mike Procter Speaking about his best performance

 

 

Mike returns for Gloucestershire Reunion

“I never really bothered much about averages, I was more concerned with how the team did, so to never lose a big game at Lord’s was a highlight, plus there was winning all the Super Tests in Australia during World Series Cricket and all those Currie Cups with Natal,” Procter told Cricinfo “And, of course, winning all those Test matches in South Africa against the Aussies.”

-Mike Procter

SPEAKING TOPICS

Cricket - History of the sport

PUNDITRY - INTERNATIONAL CRICKET

COACHING

EDUCATIONAL VISITS

AWARD CEREMONIES

MOTIVATION AND INSPIRATION

MEDIA APPEARANCES

Quotes

“Pressure is not when you are losing and you have to win, it’s when you’re expected to do something and you need to do it.”

“The past divided South Africa and people were treated unequally and we knew that but we wanted to show that it could be different.”
“…But we left knowing that we put South Africa on the map, we told them South Africa is back and not looking back.”

Mike Procter – South Africa Coach, Cricket World Cup 1992

Videos

Events

Mike Procter  at “An evening with Lord Peter Hain and Mike Procter” in discussion with Sir Nick Stadlen, to discuss the international sporting ban in the 1970s/80s and its legacies for them and for South Africa which was followed by a Q&A session. The event took place, July 10 2019 at South Africa House, London. 

The event was also attended by the South Africa High Commisioner to the UK Nomatemba “Thembi” Tambo (in the picture below).

 

Contact Us for Bookings or Enquiries

If you have any enquiries or would like to book Mike Procter for your event, please use the contact form. Please allow for 24-48 hours for our response. Thank you.